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UCDLFx 2019 has ended
Please join us for the second University of California Digital Library Forum (UC DLFx) conference, taking place May 20-22nd at UC San Diego.

When:May 20-22, 2019 (Pre-conference on May 20, sessions May 21-22)
Where: UC San Diego campus, Atkinson Hall at the Qualcomm Institute

New: you will find collaborative notes links attached to the full view of all the sessions in the schedule. Please use as you see fit!


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Monday, May 20
 

1:00pm

Wikidata Workshop for Librarians
Wikidata, a structured data repository which is freely available to anyone to edit, create, use and reuse, has emerging as a powerful tool for the library community. The ARL Wikidata Task Force White Paper (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ZsOyw2sOD3a7xJQ6XCSYDGjZUPxGGl8tuvC7vvtlJRU/edit) lists several important use cases. This workshop, especially designed for librarians, will provide an introduction to Wikidata and opportunities for attendees to practice editing existing items and creating new items in Wikidata. In addition, attendees will be encouraged to participate in a brainstorm session to talk about the potential Wikidata projects that the UC libraries may be interested in working together.    

Speakers
XL

Xiaoli Li

Head of Content Support Services, UC Davis


Monday May 20, 2019 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Geisel Library Classroom 2

1:00pm

Wait, what? Getting your bearings with ServerSpec
Library developers change jobs, we’re always the newbie. ServerSpec is a fantastic tool for keeping track of exactly what is supposed to be running on which server. Chances are such tests don’t exist in your current workplace; chances are such tests would be significantly helpful to your coworkers. This is a tool that should be in your box.

Participants will learn to write simple yet efficient ServerSpec tests, how to organize them and invoke them for different machines, ways to approach managing many tests, and ways to incorporate them into project life cycles.

We will also briefly talk about other infrastructure testing frameworks; why you would consider them instead of ServerSpec, and why you will probably want to use ServerSpec anyway, warts and all.

Pre-requirements: participants should bring a notebook computer, and have Ruby version 2.5.1 installed, if you wish to follow along with the workshop, but it's perfectly fine to just watch and take notes.


Speakers
avatar for Hardy Pottinger

Hardy Pottinger

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA
Hardy currently works on a team of developers building back-end services for UCLA Library's digital library projects. Which means he gets to play with really cool stuff like Docker containers and OpenAPI (aka Swagger) specs. His job title is Digital Library Programmer, but he is keenly... Read More →


Monday May 20, 2019 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Biomedical Library Building, Classroom 4
 
Tuesday, May 21
 

8:30am

Registration
Registration will open at 8:30 and the table will be available all day. 

Tuesday May 21, 2019 8:30am - 3:45pm
Lobby

9:30am

Welcome/Opening
Conference opening and welcome message from UC San Diego's Audrey Geisel University Librarian, Erik Mitchell.  

Speakers
avatar for Erik Mitchell

Erik Mitchell

Audrey Geisel University Librarian, UC San Diego
Erik Mitchell is the Audrey Geisel University Librarian at the University of California San Diego. Prior to UC San Diego he served as an Associate University Librarian at the University of California, Berkeley, an Assistant Professor in the College of Information Studies at the University... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:30am - 9:55am
Auditorium

10:00am

Keynote: What Comes Next, What comes after: Where we've been and where we need to go
Keynote address

Speakers
CL

Clifford Lynch

Executive Director, Coalition for Networked Information


Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:00am - 10:55am
Auditorium

11:00am

Openstreetmap Mapathon: Local Effort, Global Impact - SESSION CANCELLED
Update: Michele Tobias is unable to attend - this session is cancelled. 

When a natural disaster or humanitarian crisis strikes, maps are critical for relief efforts but much of the modern world has yet to be mapped.  Typically rural and low-income places are missing in common digital map data sets like Google Maps, Bing Maps, or Openstreetmap, making it difficult to direct aid.  How can you help a person whose house was leveled by a hurricane if you didn’t know there was a house there in the first place?  How can you educate nearby villages about Ebola prevention in a region with an outbreak if you don’t know there’s a village nearby?  Openstreetmap Mapathons aim to fill these knowledge gaps in support of humanitarian efforts and UC libraries are an ideal place to implement them.  Openstreetmap is an open source, community contributed dataset of transportation and infrastructure.  Openstreetmap provides easy to follow training materials and a mapping interface so that beginners with no previous GIS experience can begin to contribute new data in about a half an hour.  Humanitarian Openstreetmap provides a task manager with pre-defined projects that contribute directly to humanitarian relief efforts.  In this talk, I’ll discuss how I and colleagues have used existing training materials and online tools to implement quarterly Openstreetmap Mapathons in the UC Davis Library as a part of our #maptimeDavis geospatial skills workshop series.

Speakers
MT

Michele Tobias

GIS Curator, UC Davis Library, UC Davis


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Black Box Theater

11:00am

UC Systemwide ILS Project Update
In September 2018, a statewide project was kicked off to investigate how the UC Libraries might license a single, shared, systemwide ILS. Please join us for a panel of Systemwide ILS (SILS) Project participants who will be speaking on the work that’s been done so far - including our newly completed RFP - and what will come next. Panelists will discuss the project in various aspects, including large-scale project management, harmonization / normalization, and campus perspectives.

Speakers
CM

Cathy Martyniak

Director SRLF and Collaborative Shared Print Programs, SRLF/UCLA


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Auditorium

11:30am

Implementing IIIF by the Numbers
There are a lot of choices to make when implementing a IIIF server. Does one use TIFF or JP2 images as the source image format? If JP2s, should Kakadu or OpenJPEG be used? What about where the server should run? What are the advantages of running a server locally vs. in the cloud on EC2, or as a Docker container on AWS' infrastructure? There are also lots of caching options that one might want to explore, not to mention the possibility of using newer services like AWS Lambda to scale the work. How does an institution make these decisions?


At UCLA we decided to experiment with the many options available and to come up with a series of metrics that we could use to inform our decisions. For instance, what sort of impact does the caching layer have on the time that it takes to serve a newly requested (not cached) image on our IIIF server? Does the upload time for source images outweigh the value of running things at scale on Lambda? We propose to talk about our experiments, the metrics we've gathered, and the conclusions we've come to as a result of our process.


Speakers
KS

Kevin S. Clarke

Digital Library Software Developer, UCLA, UC Los Angeles
AV

Anthony Vuong

Development Support Engineer, UC Los Angeles


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:30am - 11:45am
Auditorium

11:45am

UC Davis Library Research Support - Case Study
The UC Davis Library is committed to help facilitate campus research. Since October 2018, the library has added a research support engineer position to provide more technical assistance on an array of data management topics, including; database design, architecting infrastructure, scripting (R, Python, NodeJS) and data collection methodologies. Among other considerations, potential projects are chosen to investigate common requirements among researchers across campus. This presentation will use a case study of historic agricultural experiments to highlight some of the issues and pitfalls for campus data projects and guide what short to medium term services the library can offer to provide the most value and help get researchers on the right data management course.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Merz

Justin Merz

Research Support Engineer, UC Davis



Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:45am - 12:00pm
Auditorium

12:00pm

Lunch - catered
Sandwich and salad buffet lunch will be served in the lobby/courtyard areas at Atkinson Hall.  

Tuesday May 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Lobby and Courtyard

12:00pm

Lunch Group: Digitization and Preservation
Talk with colleagues about digitization/reformatting/preservation!  This group will reserve a table at Atkinson Hall courtyard if weather is good. The Seuss Room in Geisel Library has also been reserved just in case. We will also discuss the Preservation CKG's DOC charge to update a 2011 CDL document on reformatting guidelines - https://wiki.library.ucsf.edu/display/UCLCKG/UC+Libraries+Digital+Reformatting+Guidelines - We'd love your feedback!

Speakers
avatar for Stefan Elnabli

Stefan Elnabli

Media Curation Librarian \\ Manager, Digital Reformatting Operations, UC San Diego
Stefan Elnabli is UC San Diego Library's Media Curation Librarian and Digital Reformatting Operations manager, providing strategic direction in the Library's management, preservation, and access of moving image collections. Elnabli's engagement with visual culture and digital repository... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Lobby and Courtyard

12:00pm

Lunch Group: Web Archiving CKG "Birds of a Feather"
Note: this group will get lunch at the Atkinson Hall buffet and bring it to the meeting room in the Price Center.  

Join members of the UC Libraries Web Archiving CKG (WACKG) for an informal “birds of a feather” discussion about web archiving adventures and lessons learned. We’ll kick off with a showcase of interesting finds from recently captured websites from a range of UC campus library web archive collections - feel free (though not compelled) to bring your own examples! We’ll also spend some time sharing learning experiences from challenges encountered in web archiving work so that participants can share insights, tips, and tricks for successfully capturing web archives. All are welcome, whether you’re a member of the WACKG or not and whether you’re just starting to think about web archiving or have been implementing a web archiving program in your library.

Speakers
KS

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, CDL
TM

Tori Maches

Digital Archivist, UC San Diego
RT

Rachel Taketa

UC San Francisco


Tuesday May 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Price Center Snake Path Room

1:15pm

Dryad: All of your questions answered about UC's data publishing platform
Dryad and California Digital Library (CDL) partnered to address researcher needs and drive adoption of research data publishing. Since partnering last year, a joint product team across CDL and Dryad has transitioned the Dryad digital repository on to UC’s Dash technology. As we gear up to launch this collaborative service for the UC and global research communities, it is essential that we get testing communication plans underway. We are looking to UC librarians and research stakeholders for feedback and ideas for successfully launching the renewed Dryad (while removing the branding Dash) in our UC community. Come join this session to hear about our new UC service, including discussions on Dryad’s technical infrastructure, library administrative features, and research workflow integrations.

Speakers
DL

Daniella Lowenberg

Data Publishing Product Manager, CDL


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Auditorium

1:45pm

Project Management in a Dynamically Changing Environment: Collaboration, Engagement, Agility
Library projects involve diverse stakeholders, knowledge bases and technical ecosystems. Successfully managing these initiatives requires developing unique project collaboration models, techniques and processes. As a group we will discuss some of the projects we are working on and the methods we are using to effectively support our groups, facilitate participation and engagement, and practice flexibility and adaptiveness.


The panel will present short overviews of their projects with some examples of successful strategies and tools we are using. We will open the floor to discussion for feedback, talk about examples, pros and cons of the different approaches and use cases from the audience.


Speakers
avatar for David Triebwasser

David Triebwasser

Head of Projects, Library IT, UC Berkeley
Head of Projects at UC Berkeley Library IT. Managing a team of developers and project managers to provide services to campus and public users. We are working on Digital Asset management systems, digitization and storage issues, devops processes and enhanced discovery features.
JH

Jessica Hilt

Manager of Applications Development, UC San Diego
avatar for Chrissy Rissmeyer

Chrissy Rissmeyer

Coordinator for Digital Content / Metadata Librarian, UC Santa Barbara
KS

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, CDL
RH

Rachael Hu

User Experience Design Manager, CDL



Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Black Box Theater

1:45pm

Piloting the UC Presidential Policy Implementation
Since the adoption of UC’s open access policies (UCSF Academic Senate policy in 2012, Systemwide Academic Senate policy in 2013, and UC Presidential policy in 2015), researchers have been encouraged to make their publications publicly accessible in eScholarship, UC's open access repository and publishing platform. The public now benefits from nearly 46,000 UC open access articles, and enthusiasm to participate has increased across campuses.


The UC Publication Management System, an implementation of Symplectic Elements, supports policy participation, automating much of the process of identifying and submitting articles. The system rollout to Academic Senate members began with a well-planned pilot developed in partnership between CDL and pilot campuses UC Irvine, UCLA, and UCSF. The lessons learned were integral to the smooth implementations at the remaining campuses.


Now we are ready to open this system, in phases, to the significantly greater number of UC employees who fall under the Presidential policy.


In this workshop, we will lead a conversation on the Presidential policy pilot plan, its anticipated challenges and concerns, and how we propose to address them. We also aim to gain feedback on the pilot plan and what we may be missing -- your feedback is instrumental to a successful pilot.



Speakers
AT

Alainna Therese Wrigley

Publication Management System Coordinator, CDL


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Auditorium

2:45pm

Break and Poster Presentations
The following will be presented during this session:

Highlighting diverse content through user tags / Joshua Hutchinson, Kimberly Kunaniec, Scott Stone (UCI)

Interdisciplinary Anthropology Forces / Nicole Carpenter (UCI)

Curating the Resistance: Creating a Living Archive on Student Activism / Cristela Garcia-Spitz, Rachel Myers, Tamara Rhodes, Gayatri Singh (UC San Diego) 


Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Lobby

3:15pm

Creating effective workshops using the Carpentries inclusive pedagogy
Funding bodies, campus initiatives, and professional associations have recently placed an increasing importance on training as a way to help researchers, librarians and staff better engage with the expanding array of tools, research techniques, and vast amounts of data.  The objective of many of these training programs is to improve the skills of researchers, librarians and staff in working with data.  But how do we do this effectively in a way that promotes inclusivity? The Carpentries is an open, global community teaching researchers the skills to turn data into knowledge using evidence-based teaching practices. This session provides an overview of the inclusive pedagogy and teaching practices the Carpentries uses to create, teach and improve on their workshops.  Specifically, we will cover how the Carpentries create a welcoming and supportive environment for all people regardless of background or identity. How we design our workshops with a focus on instilling a ‘growth mindset’, so learners can gain confidence in their abilities to continue learning. Finally, we'll cover some teaching practices and tips we use in our workshops that we’ve found effective in teaching technical topics to novices.

Speakers
KA

Kristian Allen

Software Architect, UC Los Angeles
avatar for Tim Dennis

Tim Dennis

Director, UCLA Library Data Science Center
avatar for Reid Otsuji

Reid Otsuji

Data Curation Specialist Librarian and Faculty Liaison, UC San Diego


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Black Box Theater

3:15pm

Introducing ROR - The Research Organization Registry
ROR is a community-led project (with CDL as one of the steering organizations) to develop an open, sustainable, usable, and unique identifier for every research organization in the world. The ROR project addresses a gap in the scholarly community ecosystem: the lack of open, stakeholder-governed-infrastructure for research organization identifiers and associated metadata that can uniquely identify research outputs with the institutions where research is produced. In short, we believe that institutions and libraries should not have to pay to access information about what and where their researchers are publishing. In this talk, I will describe the aims of ROR, discuss key use cases, present the work we have done so far to build the registry, share our plans for next steps, and solicit feedback from meeting participants about the long-term roadmap and data governance model.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager/Research Data Specialist, California Digital Library - CDL


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Auditorium

3:45pm

Leading Change in Technology Teams
There comes a time when somebody finally says it out loud: “This isn’t working anymore.” Of course, everyone knew it a long time ago. But there’s a sigh and it feels like the room isn’t quite so claustrophobic anymore: the truth is out. But that breath of fresh air doesn’t last long, soon we’re tossed about by gusting winds of competing interests, confusion, and general instability. Everything is chaotic and unstable, and again, most people are unhappy. Quick: Take action and get back to work! In my talk, I will use a case study about the UCLA Digital Library to demonstrate effective methods to let things get uncomfortable to take your team to a higher level of functioning so that it can take on bigger challenges.


At the UCLA Library, I have overseen the process of selecting a new digital library system and beginning its implementation. This talk will outline the organizational methods I used to ensure a productive and empowering process so that the Library ended up with a better digital library as well as a more effective digital library team.


Speakers
EM

Elizabeth McAulay

Digital Library Program, UCLA


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Black Box Theater

3:45pm

Laying down the Tracks: Project Surfliner
In November 2018, UC San Diego, UC Santa Barbara, and UC Los Angeles kicked off Project Surfliner, an experimental project to collaboratively define, create, and maintain digital library products. Project Surfliner is more than shared code, or even shared objectives. The project is the collaboration effort. It is building and leveraging the strengths, experiences, and resources of each campus partner to focus on shared concepts and products. Join us to learn about what we have accomplished and how the first six months of the journey have been.

Presentation (via Google Drive)

Speakers
avatar for Chrissy Rissmeyer

Chrissy Rissmeyer

Coordinator for Digital Content / Metadata Librarian, UC Santa Barbara
JH

Jessica Hilt

Manager of Applications Development, UC San Diego
avatar for John Ajao

John Ajao

Chief Technology Strategist & Associate CIO, UC Santa Barbara
TM

Tim Marconi

UC San Diego


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:45pm - 4:45pm
Auditorium

5:30pm

Reception!
Join your colleagues for some drinks and refreshments at UC San Diego's social club, The Loft. Located in the Price Center in the middle of campus.  

Tuesday May 21, 2019 5:30pm - 7:30pm
The Loft at the Price Center
 
Wednesday, May 22
 

8:30am

Registration
Registration table will be available all day. 

Wednesday May 22, 2019 8:30am - 2:00pm
Lobby

9:30am

FAIR identifiers and ARKs-in-the-Open
Does the FAIR acronym apply to identifiers as well as to content? Implications of this question for research data are explored in the context of a mainstream alternative to paywalled, siloed identifier systems. The California Digital Library (CDL) and DuraSpace are collaborating to create an open, international community around Archival Resource Keys (ARKs) and their use as persistent identifiers in the open scholarly ecosystem. The collaboration, called “ARKs in the Open”, will build on the 500 institutions (research, not-for-profit, private, government, etc.) across the world that have registered to use ARK identifiers, and the estimated 3.2 billion ARKs that have been created for digital objects, physical artifacts, people, places, and terminology.

Anticipating the decentralized web, the ARK identifier scheme is unusual in not imposing fees and not mandating use of any one choke point for all resolution. Reflecting the open ARK philosophy, the global ARK resolver (N2T.net) resolves over 600 kinds of identifiers. Since 2001, CDL has served as the incubator for ARK infrastructure, which is now poised to emerge from CDL and mature towards long-term sustainability in partnership with the 31 organizations on 4 continents whose support “ARKs in the Open” has garnered.


Speakers
avatar for John Kunze

John Kunze

Identifier Systems Architect, California Digital Library, University of California Office of the President
John Kunze is an Identifier Systems Architect at the California Digital Library. With a background in computer science and mathematics, he wrote BSD Unix software that comes pre-installed with Mac and Linux systems. He created the ARK identifier scheme, the N2T.net scheme-agnostic... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am
Auditorium

9:30am

Opening UC works in HathiTrust: How to target sets of UC copyright-owned volumes and open them for worldwide access
In the past year, librarians at UC Merced and UC San Diego have successfully opened hundreds of UC copyright-owned publications for worldwide access in HathiTrust. They used HathiTrust’s Creative Commons Declaration Form (CCDF) to apply Creative Commons licenses to the volumes. Our talk will focus on how UC librarians can use the HathiTrust’s CCDF to open targeted sets of volumes for world wide access.


Emily Lin at UC Merced will discuss her project to open over 1,000 volumes of UC Agriculture and Natural Resource (UC ANR) publications. Amy Butros at UC San Diego will discuss her process to open over 500 volumes of Scripps Institution of Oceanography publications. Renata Ewing at CDL will discuss CDL’s role in supporting this work, including developing a generalized workflow and sharing strategies that UC librarians might to use to find and compile subsets of UC-rights held content from HathiTrust corpus that may be opened using the CCDF.

Presentation




Speakers
RE

Renata Ewing

Digitization & Services Coordinator, CDL
EL

Emily Lin

Head, Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced Library
avatar for Amy Butros

Amy Butros

Earth and Marine Sciences Librarian & Scripps Institution of Oceanography Liaison Librarian, UC San Diego Library


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am
Black Box Theater

9:45am

From Personas to User-Testing: UC Santa Cruz's User-Centered Primo Implementation
This session will explore user-centered tools and methodologies used by UC Santa Cruz during our recent Primo implementation. I will discuss the creation of user personas using focus group findings, review of relevant literature, and the experiences of subject matter experts. I will explain how these personas were used when making early implementation decisions. After implementation of our Primo instance, UCSC executed a robust user testing program in which we tested 6 faculty members, 5 undergraduate students, and 1 graduate student. I will discuss the creation of our usability research questions and how these questions were formulated into actionable user tasks for testing or post-test interview questions. I will also discuss our process for analyzing our test data and making recommendations for improvements within our Primo system. Our plans for future testing, including student mediated “guerrilla testing” will also be presented.
Slides with notes: bit.ly/JWUCDLFx2019

Speakers
avatar for Jess Waggoner

Jess Waggoner

Librarian, University of California, Santa Cruz


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:45am - 10:00am
Auditorium

10:00am

The good and the bad of growing digitization
In 2016, after a year of already increasing our local digitization efforts, we produced over 230,000 images. In 2018, with increased digitization as part of the Library’s strategic plan, we produced over 1.2 million images.  The impact of this, not just on Imaging Services, the department that does the imaging, but on the rest off Library IT, and the libraries at large. Moving that many files around takes time, attention, systems that can handle the throughput, and management from creation to preservation.  We will talk about how we increased imaging, what we did to manage it, and what we plan to do to continue to increase and expand.

Speakers
LG

Lynn Grigsby

Head, Library IT, UC Berkeley
avatar for Christine Huhn

Christine Huhn

Head, Imaging Services, UC Berkeley


Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
Auditorium

10:00am

Confronting Problematic Metadata | Acknowledging Context
Descriptive metadata can become problematic when historical, cultural, or hierarchical context is disassociated from the archival object, with implications for discovery, interpretation, and the role and responsibility of the library, archive, or museum providing access to archival content. As archival materials become increasingly accessible in digital form, we find ourselves also challenged with addressing legacy descriptions influenced by creator or collector’s biases, or cultural (in)sensitivities and perspectives that don’t align with contemporary approaches and aspirations.

In this session, panelists will present on a variety of challenges we have encountered while confronting problematic legacy metadata in our collections as well as opportunities for adopting inclusivity in metadata approaches moving forward.
Please note: Join us at 11:15-11:45am for a discussion session. We will dive into a facilitated discussion for all participants to think deeply about such questions as: How can we achieve inclusive metadata? What challenges arise as/if we amend inherited descriptions? How can we enhance metadata practices to better articulate context for our collection materials? How do we remediate metadata without inadvertently erasing evidence of historical bias recorded in our collections? And finally, how might our discussion open opportunities to continue sharing insights and approaches, perhaps even developing common best practices?

NOTE: 2-part session - panel, then discussion after break

Speakers
avatar for Christine Kim

Christine Kim

OAC/Calisphere Service & Outreach Manager, California Digital Library
KS

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, CDL
avatar for Melissa Stoner

Melissa Stoner

Native American Studies Librarian, UC Berkeley
Melissa Stoner specializes in digital archives and collections, she is currently coordinating the creation of the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library digital lab
avatar for Krystal Tribbett

Krystal Tribbett

Curator for Orange County Regional History, Research Librarian for Orange County, UC Irvine
I am interested in community-based archives, collection strategies to build regional history archives, diversity and inclusion, and postcustodial theory and practice.
JZ

Jimmy Zavala

Transforming Knowledge/Transforming Libraries Project Coordinator Librarian, UC Irvine


Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:00am - 11:00am
Black Box Theater

10:30am

The UC Davis Digital Asset Management System (DAMS)
UC Davis is developing a digital asset management system (DAMS) based on the Fedora API specification and associated micro-services.  For the standard user interface, we concentrate on support for collections described by schema.org.  In this presentation we will review the DAMS architecture and it's associated services. We will describe some of the types of items that are included in the collections, and how their data are organized within the DAMS using definitions from schema.org.  We will also discuss our efforts to standardize item level metadata and share our collections.

Speakers
avatar for Quinn Hart

Quinn Hart

Digital Applications Manager, UC Davis



Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:30am - 11:00am
Auditorium

11:00am

Break!
Break!

Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Auditorium

11:00am

Break!
Break!

Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am
Black Box Theater

11:30am

Using the Semantic Web LibGuide
The Semantic Web is based on a "Layer Cake" of Linked Data technologies. Learning about the technologies and tools that make this work can be daunting. When I was asked to teach the UCLA Continuing Resources Study Group about Linked Data, I was still in the early stages of learning about the technology myself. As I worked through the learning curves, I developed a Semantic Web LibGuide which lists best practices, learning resources, ontologies & vocabularies, tools, and use cases. My presentation will highlight the ways in which the LibGuide can be used to access useful Semantic Web resources.
Areas I would like to cover are: The Linked Open Data Cloud & Best Practices; Semantic Web Tools, Vocabularies, and examples of Use Cases.


The web address for the LibGuide is: https://guides.library.ucla.edu/semantic-web


Speakers
avatar for Rhonda Super

Rhonda Super

Library Print Acquisitions, UCLA
Interested in applying linked data to library services.



Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:30am - 11:45am
Auditorium

11:30am

Confronting Problematic Metadata | Toward Inclusive Practices (discussion)
In this session, we will dive into a facilitated discussion for all participants to think deeply about such questions as: How can we achieve inclusive metadata? What challenges arise as/if we amend inherited descriptions? How can we enhance metadata practices to better articulate context for our collection materials? How do we remediate metadata without inadvertently erasing evidence of historical bias recorded in our collections? And finally, how might our discussion open opportunities to continue sharing insights and approaches, perhaps even developing common best practices?
Descriptive metadata can become problematic when historical, cultural, or hierarchical context is disassociated from the archival object, with implications for discovery, interpretation, and the role and responsibility of the library, archive, or museum providing access to archival content. As archival materials become increasingly accessible in digital form, we find ourselves also challenged with addressing legacy descriptions influenced by creator or collector’s biases, or cultural (in)sensitivities and perspectives that don’t align with contemporary approaches and aspirations.
Please note: This discussion follows panelist session presenting on a variety of challenges we have encountered while confronting problematic legacy metadata in our collections as well as opportunities for adopting inclusivity in metadata approaches moving forward. All participants are welcome to attend; it is not required to attend the earlier panel session.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Kim

Christine Kim

OAC/Calisphere Service & Outreach Manager, California Digital Library
KS

Kathryn Stine

Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy, CDL
avatar for Melissa Stoner

Melissa Stoner

Native American Studies Librarian, UC Berkeley
Melissa Stoner specializes in digital archives and collections, she is currently coordinating the creation of the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library digital lab
avatar for Krystal Tribbett

Krystal Tribbett

Curator for Orange County Regional History, Research Librarian for Orange County, UC Irvine
I am interested in community-based archives, collection strategies to build regional history archives, diversity and inclusion, and postcustodial theory and practice.
JZ

Jimmy Zavala

Transforming Knowledge/Transforming Libraries Project Coordinator Librarian, UC Irvine


Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm
Black Box Theater

11:45am

Data Lake: Promoting a Home Grown Mega-Tool for the Assessment Lifecycle
A recently created Library Strategic Plan at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) identified the need to integrate a culture of assessment throughout the organization in order to encourage more data informed decision-making processes. Our Assessment for Change Team (ACT) was formed and charged with spearheading this cultural evolution. This case study will discuss the development of a home-grown tool that assists with assessment brainstorming, and acts as a central repository for assessment products – the Data Lake.


Data Lake is an enterprise wide collaboration platform used for managing change and an assessment culture within the Library. First, a guided questionnaire assists with brainstorming and planning of assessment ideas while invoking dynamic reports and notification of resource managers at critical points within the assessment lifecycle. Next, the platform enables abstracting, indexing and storage of raw data and assessment tools while supporting dynamic visualizations, reports and dashboards. Finally, connections with service tickets and project plans are promoted as assessment plans morph into reports and data informed decisions to launch or change projects.


Speakers
SS

Sharon Shafer

Head of Search and Assessment, UCLA
DP

Dana Peterman

Digital Initiatives & Information Technology, UC Los Angeles


Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:45am - 12:00pm
Auditorium

12:00pm

Catered lunch - newly added!
Moroccan buffet lunch will be served in the Lobby / Courtyard area at Atkinson Hall

Wednesday May 22, 2019 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Lobby and Courtyard

12:00pm

Lunch Discussion: Developing a Digital Preservation Strategy at UC
Note: This group will meet in the courtyard at reserved tables.  The UC Libraries Direction and Oversight Committee has convened a working group to explore a systemwide digital preservation strategy for the UC Libraries. This group, the UC Digital Preservation Strategy working group, has been charged with: 1) Investigating UC Libraries' current and planned digital preservation capabilities and needs, 2) Drafting and overview of best practices for digital preservation, 3) Drafting a comparison with digital preservation services and strategies of external digital preservation service and software organizations, and 4) preparing a charge for the next phase of this group. This session will be a relatively informal working lunch to discuss the work of the group and give an opportunity for other UC Stakeholders to provide suggestions, feedback, and consult on the work of the Digital Preservation Strategy working group and possible directions it might take. Both technical and non-technical practitioners are encouraged to attend.

Speakers
CM

Charles Macquarie

Digital Archivist, UCSF


Wednesday May 22, 2019 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Lobby and Courtyard

1:15pm

One DAMS Thing After Another
As UCSC moves our digital collections from CONTENTdm to our new Samvera-based DAMS, we’re migrating metadata and republishing 40,000 objects from over 40 collections.  We’ll cover the process for remediating the metadata and moving large numbers of files. We’ll also outline our workflow for publishing the new collections in Calisphere and our new Primo discovery layer.  Finally, we’ll discuss how we plan to close out the access to the old objects in CONTENTdm and update links to those items.
Slides link.

Speakers
avatar for Sue Perry

Sue Perry

Head of Digital Initiatives, UC Santa Cruz
UC Santa Cruz, United States of America
RJ

Rachel Jaffe

Metadata Librarian, UC Santa Cruz



Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Auditorium

1:15pm

Open for Unconference Etc.
After lunch, the Black Box Theater room will be open for Unconference or other activities.  

Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:15pm - 4:00pm
Black Box Theater

1:45pm

A Tale of Two (Possible) Virtual Reading Rooms
Virtual Reading Rooms (VRRs) hold a promise to enable remote, mediated access to born-digital and digitized collections. In this panel colleagues representing Special Collections & Archives, Digital Library Development, and Information Technology will lift the lid off two distinct approaches to Virtual Reading Room development currently underway at UC Irvine and UC San Diego including their motivations for providing this form of access, the technologies and technological approaches involved in the products’ ongoing development, and the partnerships and collaborations that underpin each project. Panelists will address past successes and challenges, provide updates on their work-to-date, share the vision each campus holds for future progress, and seek feedback from participants regarding their institutional limitations and considerations for implementing a VRR

Speakers
HS

Heather Smedberg

Reference and Instruction Coordinator, Special Collections and Archives, UC San Diego
RK

Rob Kaufman

Founding Partner, Senior Developer, Notch8
JH

Jessica Hilt

Manager of Applications Development, UC San Diego
MP

Matt Peters

Electronic Services Coordinator, Special Collections and Archives, UC San Diego
avatar for Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez

Elvia Arroyo-Ramirez

Assistant University Archivist, UCI Libraries, UC Irvine
DQ

Derek Quezada

Outreach and Public Services Librarian for Special Collections and Archives, UC Irvine


Wednesday May 22, 2019 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Auditorium

2:45pm

Closing
Join us for a brief closing session and exercise

Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Auditorium