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UCDLFx 2019 has ended
Please join us for the second University of California Digital Library Forum (UC DLFx) conference, taking place May 20-22nd at UC San Diego.

When:May 20-22, 2019 (Pre-conference on May 20, sessions May 21-22)
Where: UC San Diego campus, Atkinson Hall at the Qualcomm Institute

New: you will find collaborative notes links attached to the full view of all the sessions in the schedule. Please use as you see fit!


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UC-Wide [clear filter]
Tuesday, May 21
 

11:00am PDT

UC Systemwide ILS Project Update
In September 2018, a statewide project was kicked off to investigate how the UC Libraries might license a single, shared, systemwide ILS. Please join us for a panel of Systemwide ILS (SILS) Project participants who will be speaking on the work that’s been done so far - including our newly completed RFP - and what will come next. Panelists will discuss the project in various aspects, including large-scale project management, harmonization / normalization, and campus perspectives.

Speakers
avatar for Cathy Martyniak

Cathy Martyniak

Director SRLF and Collaborative Shared Print Programs, SRLF/UCLA


Tuesday May 21, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am PDT
Auditorium

1:15pm PDT

Dryad: All of your questions answered about UC's data publishing platform
Dryad and California Digital Library (CDL) partnered to address researcher needs and drive adoption of research data publishing. Since partnering last year, a joint product team across CDL and Dryad has transitioned the Dryad digital repository on to UC’s Dash technology. As we gear up to launch this collaborative service for the UC and global research communities, it is essential that we get testing communication plans underway. We are looking to UC librarians and research stakeholders for feedback and ideas for successfully launching the renewed Dryad (while removing the branding Dash) in our UC community. Come join this session to hear about our new UC service, including discussions on Dryad’s technical infrastructure, library administrative features, and research workflow integrations.

Speakers
avatar for Daniella Lowenberg

Daniella Lowenberg

Data Publishing Product Manager, California Digital Library
Product Manager for Dryad at California Digital Library and member of the Make Data Count team working to provide stewardship for open data and develop meaningful metrics for measuring the impact of data in the research world. Many kinds of identifiers are the connectors in this world and Daniella is working with many partners to make those connections happen... Read More →


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:15pm - 1:45pm PDT
Auditorium

1:45pm PDT

Piloting the UC Presidential Policy Implementation
Since the adoption of UC’s open access policies (UCSF Academic Senate policy in 2012, Systemwide Academic Senate policy in 2013, and UC Presidential policy in 2015), researchers have been encouraged to make their publications publicly accessible in eScholarship, UC's open access repository and publishing platform. The public now benefits from nearly 46,000 UC open access articles, and enthusiasm to participate has increased across campuses.


The UC Publication Management System, an implementation of Symplectic Elements, supports policy participation, automating much of the process of identifying and submitting articles. The system rollout to Academic Senate members began with a well-planned pilot developed in partnership between CDL and pilot campuses UC Irvine, UCLA, and UCSF. The lessons learned were integral to the smooth implementations at the remaining campuses.


Now we are ready to open this system, in phases, to the significantly greater number of UC employees who fall under the Presidential policy.


In this workshop, we will lead a conversation on the Presidential policy pilot plan, its anticipated challenges and concerns, and how we propose to address them. We also aim to gain feedback on the pilot plan and what we may be missing -- your feedback is instrumental to a successful pilot.



Speakers
AT

Alainna Therese Wrigley

ucpms coord, ucop


Tuesday May 21, 2019 1:45pm - 2:45pm PDT
Auditorium

3:15pm PDT

Introducing ROR - The Research Organization Registry
ROR is a community-led project (with CDL as one of the steering organizations) to develop an open, sustainable, usable, and unique identifier for every research organization in the world. The ROR project addresses a gap in the scholarly community ecosystem: the lack of open, stakeholder-governed-infrastructure for research organization identifiers and associated metadata that can uniquely identify research outputs with the institutions where research is produced. In short, we believe that institutions and libraries should not have to pay to access information about what and where their researchers are publishing. In this talk, I will describe the aims of ROR, discuss key use cases, present the work we have done so far to build the registry, share our plans for next steps, and solicit feedback from meeting participants about the long-term roadmap and data governance model.

Speakers
avatar for Maria Gould

Maria Gould

Product Manager, California Digital Library


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:15pm - 3:45pm PDT
Auditorium
 
Wednesday, May 22
 

9:30am PDT

FAIR identifiers and ARKs-in-the-Open
Does the FAIR acronym apply to identifiers as well as to content? Implications of this question for research data are explored in the context of a mainstream alternative to paywalled, siloed identifier systems. The California Digital Library (CDL) and DuraSpace are collaborating to create an open, international community around Archival Resource Keys (ARKs) and their use as persistent identifiers in the open scholarly ecosystem. The collaboration, called “ARKs in the Open”, will build on the 500 institutions (research, not-for-profit, private, government, etc.) across the world that have registered to use ARK identifiers, and the estimated 3.2 billion ARKs that have been created for digital objects, physical artifacts, people, places, and terminology.

Anticipating the decentralized web, the ARK identifier scheme is unusual in not imposing fees and not mandating use of any one choke point for all resolution. Reflecting the open ARK philosophy, the global ARK resolver (N2T.net) resolves over 600 kinds of identifiers. Since 2001, CDL has served as the incubator for ARK infrastructure, which is now poised to emerge from CDL and mature towards long-term sustainability in partnership with the 31 organizations on 4 continents whose support “ARKs in the Open” has garnered.


Speakers
avatar for John Kunze

John Kunze

Identifier Systems Architect, California Digital Library
John Kunze is an Identifier Systems Architect at the California Digital Library. With a background in computer science and mathematics, he wrote BSD Unix software that comes pre-installed with Mac and Linux systems. He created the ARK identifier scheme, the N2T.net scheme-agnostic... Read More →



Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:30am - 9:45am PDT
Auditorium

9:30am PDT

Opening UC works in HathiTrust: How to target sets of UC copyright-owned volumes and open them for worldwide access
In the past year, librarians at UC Merced and UC San Diego have successfully opened hundreds of UC copyright-owned publications for worldwide access in HathiTrust. They used HathiTrust’s Creative Commons Declaration Form (CCDF) to apply Creative Commons licenses to the volumes. Our talk will focus on how UC librarians can use the HathiTrust’s CCDF to open targeted sets of volumes for world wide access.


Emily Lin at UC Merced will discuss her project to open over 1,000 volumes of UC Agriculture and Natural Resource (UC ANR) publications. Amy Butros at UC San Diego will discuss her process to open over 500 volumes of Scripps Institution of Oceanography publications. Renata Ewing at CDL will discuss CDL’s role in supporting this work, including developing a generalized workflow and sharing strategies that UC librarians might to use to find and compile subsets of UC-rights held content from HathiTrust corpus that may be opened using the CCDF.

Presentation




Speakers
RE

Renata Ewing

Digitization & Services Coordinator, CDL
avatar for Emily Lin

Emily Lin

Head, Digital Curation and Scholarship, UC Merced Library
avatar for Amy Butros

Amy Butros

Earth and Marine Sciences Librarian & Scripps Institution of Oceanography Liaison Librarian, UC San Diego Library


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:30am - 10:00am PDT
Black Box Theater

10:00am PDT

Confronting Problematic Metadata | Acknowledging Context
Descriptive metadata can become problematic when historical, cultural, or hierarchical context is disassociated from the archival object, with implications for discovery, interpretation, and the role and responsibility of the library, archive, or museum providing access to archival content. As archival materials become increasingly accessible in digital form, we find ourselves also challenged with addressing legacy descriptions influenced by creator or collector’s biases, or cultural (in)sensitivities and perspectives that don’t align with contemporary approaches and aspirations.

In this session, panelists will present on a variety of challenges we have encountered while confronting problematic legacy metadata in our collections as well as opportunities for adopting inclusivity in metadata approaches moving forward.
Please note: Join us at 11:15-11:45am for a discussion session. We will dive into a facilitated discussion for all participants to think deeply about such questions as: How can we achieve inclusive metadata? What challenges arise as/if we amend inherited descriptions? How can we enhance metadata practices to better articulate context for our collection materials? How do we remediate metadata without inadvertently erasing evidence of historical bias recorded in our collections? And finally, how might our discussion open opportunities to continue sharing insights and approaches, perhaps even developing common best practices?

NOTE: 2-part session - panel, then discussion after break

Speakers
avatar for Christine Kim

Christine Kim

OAC/Calisphere Service & Outreach Manager, California Digital Library
avatar for Kathryn Stine

Kathryn Stine

Senior Product Manager, Digitization, California Digital Library
avatar for Melissa Stoner

Melissa Stoner

Native American Studies Librarian, University of California, Berkeley
Melissa Stoner (Diné) is Native American Studies Librarian at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on emerging technologies, and the digitization practices of historical and ethnographic materials that contain culturally sensitive information.
avatar for Krystal Tribbett

Krystal Tribbett

Curator for Orange County Regional History, Research Librarian for Orange County, UC Irvine
I am interested in community-based archives, collection strategies to build regional history archives, diversity and inclusion, and postcustodial theory and practice.
JZ

Jimmy Zavala

Transforming Knowledge/Transforming Libraries Project Coordinator Librarian, UC Irvine


Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:00am - 11:00am PDT
Black Box Theater

11:30am PDT

Confronting Problematic Metadata | Toward Inclusive Practices (discussion)
In this session, we will dive into a facilitated discussion for all participants to think deeply about such questions as: How can we achieve inclusive metadata? What challenges arise as/if we amend inherited descriptions? How can we enhance metadata practices to better articulate context for our collection materials? How do we remediate metadata without inadvertently erasing evidence of historical bias recorded in our collections? And finally, how might our discussion open opportunities to continue sharing insights and approaches, perhaps even developing common best practices?
Descriptive metadata can become problematic when historical, cultural, or hierarchical context is disassociated from the archival object, with implications for discovery, interpretation, and the role and responsibility of the library, archive, or museum providing access to archival content. As archival materials become increasingly accessible in digital form, we find ourselves also challenged with addressing legacy descriptions influenced by creator or collector’s biases, or cultural (in)sensitivities and perspectives that don’t align with contemporary approaches and aspirations.
Please note: This discussion follows panelist session presenting on a variety of challenges we have encountered while confronting problematic legacy metadata in our collections as well as opportunities for adopting inclusivity in metadata approaches moving forward. All participants are welcome to attend; it is not required to attend the earlier panel session.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Kim

Christine Kim

OAC/Calisphere Service & Outreach Manager, California Digital Library
avatar for Kathryn Stine

Kathryn Stine

Senior Product Manager, Digitization, California Digital Library
avatar for Melissa Stoner

Melissa Stoner

Native American Studies Librarian, University of California, Berkeley
Melissa Stoner (Diné) is Native American Studies Librarian at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on emerging technologies, and the digitization practices of historical and ethnographic materials that contain culturally sensitive information.
avatar for Krystal Tribbett

Krystal Tribbett

Curator for Orange County Regional History, Research Librarian for Orange County, UC Irvine
I am interested in community-based archives, collection strategies to build regional history archives, diversity and inclusion, and postcustodial theory and practice.
JZ

Jimmy Zavala

Transforming Knowledge/Transforming Libraries Project Coordinator Librarian, UC Irvine


Wednesday May 22, 2019 11:30am - 12:00pm PDT
Black Box Theater